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District News & Announcements – January 2022

District News & Announcements

January 2022

“District News and Announcements” is a monthly e-newsletter for members and friends of the Church of the Brethren in the Northern Plains District.  District Leaders, Commissions, Committees, and those doing special ministries share information on programs and activities.  Local churches share news and invitations.  Send submissions by January 25th for inclusion in next month’s newsletter to Hannah Button-Harrison, Director of Communications, communications@nplains.org.

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In this issue

  1. District Youth Lock-In: January 15-16
  2. January 18th Northern Plains Insight Session
  3. Jesus in the Neighborhood Grants
  4. Camp Pine Lake News
  5. Continuing Education Courses
  6. Moderator Moment
  7. Holiness in our Midst
  8. Leadership Development Musings
  9. Quilt Blocks for Annual Conference
  10. Maria’s Kit of Comfort Books
  11. 2022 Prayer Calendars
  12. Congregational Newsletters

Quick info

Calendar of Events | District Staff & Leadership Contacts | Documents & Resources

Banner photo: Beautiful sunrise over the Prairie City Church of the Brethren.  Photo by Phyllis Peter.  Send in your photos for future newsletters!  Email communications@nplains.org.

Holiness in our Midst: Session 112

Holiness in our Midst

SESSION CXII: ON KEEPING CHRISTMAS

Story Circle Prompt: How can you keep Christmas, that is, the spirit of goodwill, throughout the New Year? 

I was writing my 2021 Christmas “thank you” notes when a Salvation Army commercial came on about keeping Christmas going after the holidays. Thus, the inspiration for this question and my answer. To “keep Christmas,” I will think of myself as a living, breathing thank you note whenever I am served by clerks and waiters or as a walking grace note when I serve residents in my assisted living workplace. Perhaps this simple plan will do as much to change the world as taking on a new cause or practice in my already-busy schedule. I’m looking forward to finding out. How can you keep Christmas alive during the New Year?

FOR PERSONAL/JOURNAL REFLECTION:

  1. Read the above reflection. In your journal, answer the following: How will I keep the spirit of Christmas alive during the New Year?

FOR GROUP STUDY: 

 1.   Read aloud Session CXII.

  2.   Ask each person to answer the Story Circle Prompt.

[View Past Sessions Here]

Note: Holiness in Our MidstSharing Our Stories to Encourage and Heal is a monthly on-line feature created by Janis Pyle to facilitate sharing of our personal experiences, thoughts, beliefs, and spiritual practices with one another, especially through stories. Barriers are broken down when we begin to see all persons, even those with whom we disagree ideologically, as sacred and constantly attended to by a loving Creator. Each column is accompanied by a “story circle” prompt and study guides for personal and group reflection. To share your stories, contact Hannah Button-Harrison at communications@nplains.org. Janis Pyle can be reached at janispyle@yahoo.com.

2021 Advent Calendar

District Advent Calendar 2021

Church Events:
Church of the Brethren at Ankeny
Fairview COB
Ivester COB
Open Circle COB
Panora COB
Panther Creek COB
Prairie City COB
South Waterloo COB

Please contact each church if you have questions about the programs mentioned below.

Other News:
Northern Plains Insight Session: December 21
National Youth Conference Early Bird Registration
2022 Prayer Calendars

District News & Announcements – August 2021

District News & Announcements

August 2021

“District News and Announcements” is a monthly e-newsletter for members and friends of the Church of the Brethren in the Northern Plains District.  District Leaders, Commissions, Committees, and those doing special ministries share information on programs and activities.  Local churches share news and invitations.  Send submissions by August 25th for inclusion in next month’s newsletter to Hannah Button-Harrison, Director of Communications, communications@nplains.org.

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In this issue

  1. 2021 DISTRICT CONFERENCE: AUGUST 6-8, 2021
  2. DC Young Adult Worship Service
  3. Camp Pine Lake News
  4. Panora Pancake Breakfast & Ice cream social
  5. Disaster Ministries Building Project, King Lake, NE
  6. Continuing Education Courses
  7. Holiness in our Midst
  8. Leadership Development Musings
  9. National Youth Conference 2022
  10. Feeding America campaign for the Northern Plains District
  11. NOAC Scholarships
  12. CoB Olympic Athletes
  13. Congregational Newsletters

Quick info

Calendar of Events | District Staff & Leadership Contacts | Documents & Resources

Banner photo: Campers and counselors acting silly.  Photo by Betsy Kuecker. Send in your photos for future newsletters!  Email communications@nplains.org.

District News & Announcements – July 2021

District News & Announcements

July 2021

“District News and Announcements” is a monthly e-newsletter for members and friends of the Church of the Brethren in the Northern Plains District.  District Leaders, Commissions, Committees, and those doing special ministries share information on programs and activities.  Local churches share news and invitations.  Send submissions by July 25th for inclusion in next month’s newsletter to Hannah Button-Harrison, Director of Communications, communications@nplains.org.

Trouble viewing pictures and videos? 
Click here to view the newsletter in your browser.

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In this issue

  1. Camp Pine Lake News
  2. Dave Kerkove’s Turtle Jubilee Birthday Party – July 18
  3. Dallas Center Ice Cream Social – July 21st
  4. 2021 Virtual District Conference
  5. Moderator Moment
  6. Holiness in our Midst
  7. National Youth Conference 2022
  8. Feeding America campaign for the Northern Plains District
  9. NOAC Scholarships
  10. Congregational Newsletters

Quick info

Calendar of Events | District Staff & Leadership Contacts | Documents & Resources

Banner photo: Congrats district graduates – Addison Gingrich from Open Circle and Emma Cage, Tom Lee from Lewiston.  Photos by Beth Cage. Send in your photos for future newsletters!  Email communications@nplains.org.

Holiness in our Midst: Session 106

Holiness in our Midst

SESSION CVI: ON ‘POSTCARDS FROM GOD”

Story Circle Prompt: Do you receive “postcards from God?” How are they delivered? What are the messages/images?

My practice of looking for “postcards from God” began April 15, 2020, the Wednesday after Easter. It was back in the days when all I worried about was a world-wide pandemic. (I have since added the future of U.S. democracy.) 

I had called into the Ames First Christian Church noontime prayer line. During sharing time, I was touched by a member of the circle who had come across 70 picture postcards while cleaning drawers and had used them to send messages of good cheer while life was at a standstill. After the leader closed with prayer. I found myself spontaneously saying, “P.S., Lord, please send us little postcards from you.” (My real prayer to the Almighty at the time was something like: What in the WORLD are you doing? Where ARE you?”  Hence, I did not expect an answer to my request.)

The next day, sitting at my desk, I looked down at a yellow stickie note. It stood out like a neon sign. My first postcard had been hiding in plain sight. The note preserved a quote I saw in the Chat Box during the Easter Sunday Zoom service three days earlier. Former Pastor David Digby had written: “The dog and I walked in the cool and cleansing rain this morning out at Peterson Pits, a bit after sunrise, and we thought long thoughts about Resurrection and eternity and love, and the rain baptized us both with Easter and hope. It was good.” 

More than a year later, I have opened a whole file cabinet in my brain and an actual file on my computer to store all the postcards I have received. My definition of “postcards from God” has become “visual images so moving that I want to frame them or word pictures so strong that they leave a lasting impression.” Receiving them changed my prayer stance from chronic complainer to active recorder of ways God is communicating with me!

Here are some postcards from my “collection”:

In the early evening on Earth Day 2020, the weather vacillated between sunshiny and rainy on a “joy drive” through the countryside. Rainbow conditions, for sure. As I alternately drove through fields of sunbeams, windows down, and sheets of rain, I was conscious of many glorious picture postcards from God. A weathered shed shrouded in swirling clouds. A farmstead on a hill, its two-story house, barns, poplar windbreak and silo silhouetted against the setting sun. A patchwork quilt of fields as far as my eye could see. To do justice to the memory of the images that day, there would have to be a scratch and sniff feature to capture that fragrance of just-planted Iowa black earth when the rain settles the dust. (My Scrabble-playing friends know that this is called petrichor.) Driving past the farm I grew up on near the town of Fernald, I hinted to God that a rainbow over it just then would be a fine touch, a perfect postcard, but no. For the record, a double rainbow hung over my apartment building and adjacent field as I pulled into my parking lot that evening. For real!

…….

A few days later my friend Tony, a geriatric social worker from suburban Chicago, sent his latest round of e-mail photos from woodland trails. He is a modern-day St. Francis of Assisi. Even on his bike, wildlife likes and trusts him, even follows him around. I began categorizing his visual images and word pictures of snapping turtles, salamanders, bald eagles and great blue herons as “postcards from God.” One morning after his sister Debra passed away in October, he woke up early, thinking of her. Along his walking path that morning was a doe with four fawns. 

…….

Around this time, I stopped in at Casey’s on Lincoln Highway in Nevada for my daily papers and treats. Meghin, the associate on duty, was sitting down at her cash register station. “He likes breadsticks,” she said, pointing to her tummy. “Are you eating for two?” I asked, though I could see the answer. She volunteered that she had gotten a sonogram of her ultrasound earlier that day and wondered if I would like to see it. “Yes, of course!” The thought, “postcard from God,” flashed through my mind as I got my first glimpse of little Alexzander (yes, spelled with a z), who already had dark locks of hair. Alex appeared in person on June 17, 2020. Though I have never actually met him, I have followed his visits to grandpa and his attempts to fly before he walked on Mehgin’s iPhone, each image a precious postcard in an ongoing series. In one memorable video, in a front-facing baby carrier, he is kicking and squealing at the fish in the aquarium at Blank Park Zoo. (I just saw pictures from his first birthday party.)

…….

The daily lives of my family members are also a source of holy postcards. An example: the photo my younger sister Jill of the Denver suburbs sent from Mother’s Day 2020. There she was surrounded by her grandchildren with their gift of a clay flowerpot decorated with butterflies and flowers created from their handprints and footprints. Another postcard was from my older sister Janet, who lives in an assisted living center in Dallas Center. In vivid detail, she described a group effort to create a dazzling display of 100 hearts in all colors and sizes to surprise a resident on her hundredth birthday.

…….

For a couple weeks in June of 2020, a row of poster-sized photos of the Nevada High School Class of 2020 was attached to the south side of the school’s chain link fence baseball diamond. More like a banner than a postcard, the grouping withstood all sorts of weather. More than once, I wondered if this class was set apart by God for something special, uniquely strengthened from the bond formed by COVID-19 hardships. Time will tell. 

…….

In the early evening after the derecho on Aug. 10, 2020, my neighbors and I assessed the damage on our street. We were accompanied by the only living being grateful for the storm: Ryder, our apartment building German Shepherd, named after the trucking company. Because she lives to pick up sticks, she had already amassed enough for a bonfire on our lawn. A postcard image is etched in my mind from that walk: Ryder smiling at me while holding a stick in her mouth. Heaven for her is an eternal game of fetch.

…….

On Dec. 21, 2020, I bundled up in the late evening to behold the brilliant light, the “Star of Bethlehem,” from the once-in-800-years alignment of Jupiter and Saturn and pronounced it a “postcard from God.”

…….

Still, in 2021, the postcards keep coming, not every day, but often enough to help me realize that there is an abiding order to the Universe. I often think back to the most dramatic postcard I received. On April 17, 2020, just two days after becoming conscious of the concept. I entered the kitchen at my workplace, Windsor Manor Assisted Living Center in Nevada. I was given permission to visit a resident named Bill in his final hours. As I sat on a chair holding his hand and saying my good-byes, I was aware only of his shallow breathing and a big colorful sign outside his window, which read WELCOME HOME. The thought, “postcard from God,” crossed my mind as I took time to thank him for being so kind to me in my role as culinary server. On my day off, Bill had returned from the hospital, and his friends had put the sign outside his window to welcome him back to his room. But the message was also visible as he was passing. I was able to suggest to the family, as a comfort, that perhaps it was no coincidence the sign was still in place as he crossed over to his Heavenly Home.

FOR PERSONAL/JOURNAL REFLECTION:

  1. Read the above reflection. In your journal, answer the question: Have you ever received “postcards” from God? What were the images or messages?
  1. FOR GROUP STUDY:

      1.   Read aloud Session CVI.

      2.   Ask each person to answer the Story Circle Prompt. 

[View Past Sessions Here]

Note: Holiness in Our MidstSharing Our Stories to Encourage and Heal is a monthly on-line feature created by Janis Pyle to facilitate sharing of our personal experiences, thoughts, beliefs, and spiritual practices with one another, especially through stories. Barriers are broken down when we begin to see all persons, even those with whom we disagree ideologically, as sacred and constantly attended to by a loving Creator. Each column is accompanied by a “story circle” prompt and study guides for personal and group reflection. To share your stories, contact Hannah Button-Harrison at communications@nplains.org. Janis Pyle can be reached at janispyle@yahoo.com.

District News & Announcements – June 2021

District News & Announcements

June 2021

“District News and Announcements” is a monthly e-newsletter for members and friends of the Church of the Brethren in the Northern Plains District.  District Leaders, Commissions, Committees, and those doing special ministries share information on programs and activities.  Local churches share news and invitations.  Send submissions by June 24th for inclusion in next month’s newsletter to Hannah Button-Harrison, Director of Communications, communications@nplains.org.

Trouble viewing pictures and videos? 
Click here to view the newsletter in your browser.

TO PRINT – go to browser view
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In this issue

  1. Thomas McMullin Ordination Ceremony – June 6
  2. Camp Pine Lake News
  3. Dave Kerkove’s Turtle Jubilee Birthday Party – July 18
  4. Dallas Center Ice Cream Social – July 21st
  5. 2021 Virtual District Conference
  6. Moderator Moment
  7. Holiness in our Midst
  8. District-wide Compelling Vision Bible Study Continues
  9. Feeding America campaign for the Northern Plains District
  10. NOAC Scholarships
  11. Congregational Newsletters

Quick info

Calendar of Events | District Staff & Leadership Contacts | Documents & Resources

Banner photo: This tree frog was found visiting the red house at Camp Pine Lake.  Photo by Betsy Kuecker. Send in your photos for future newsletters!  Email communications@nplains.org.

District News & Announcements – May 2021

District News & Announcements

May 2021

“District News and Announcements” is a monthly e-newsletter for members and friends of the Church of the Brethren in the Northern Plains District.  District Leaders, Commissions, Committees, and those doing special ministries share information on programs and activities.  Local churches share news and invitations.  Send submissions by May 25th for inclusion in next month’s newsletter to Hannah Button-Harrison, Director of Communications, communications@nplains.org.

Trouble viewing pictures and videos? 
Click here to view the newsletter in your browser.

TO PRINT – go to browser view
Windows: right click + Print OR [Ctrl] + P
Mac: [Ctrl] + click + Print OR [Command] + P

In this issue

  1. Thomas McMullin Ordination Ceremony – June 6
  2. Camp Pine Lake News
  3. REMINDER: DO NOT RESPOND TO FAKE EMAILS
  4. Upcoming “Healing Racism” Events
  5. 2021 Virtual District Conference
  6. Moderator Moment
  7. Holiness in our Midst
  8. Leadership Development Musings
  9. Camp Cleanup Day
  10. District-wide Compelling Vision Bible Study Continues
  11. Feeding America campaign for the Northern Plains District
  12. NOAC Scholarships
  13. News from the District Leadership Call Team
  14. Congregational Newsletters

Quick info

Calendar of Events | District Staff & Leadership Contacts | Documents & Resources

Banner photo: Ella Stout, daughter of Hosts Andrew and Heather Stout, and Brooklyne Kuecker, daughter of Directors Matt and Betsy Kuecker, oversee the beautiful kingdom of Camp Pine Lake.  Photo by Betsy Kuecker. Send in your photos for future newsletters!  Email communications@nplains.org.

Holiness in our Midst: Session 104

Holiness in our Midst

SESSION CIV: ON COVID ‘NEGATIVES’

Story Circle Prompt: What insights can you share to help others cope with or face the negative impacts of COVID-19?

(Last month’s Story Circle Prompt was about the “positives” that have come out of the pandemic.) This month’s prompt addresses the very real negatives of this time. This column is my response:

AN EXHIBIT RECALLED: VISUALIZLING 570,299 LIVES 

Until a recent breakthrough experience, I could only begin to comprehend the (ever-growing) number on the righthand panel of my TV screen, the U.S. deaths from COVID-19. 

As I am writing this on the morning of April 22, it reads 570,299, according to CNN. 

Understanding the magnitude of our collective loss— and tending my personal grief— have been a necessary passage before fully entering Life after The Lockdown.

Others’ attempts to give face and voice to individual victims have helped along my process of fathoming the loss. Among them:

  • Nicole Wallace’s daily segments on MSNBC, “Remembering Lives Well-Lived,” often move me to tears.
  • Two national events, a vigil of lights at the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool to commemorate 400,000 lives lost on Jan. 19, inauguration eve, and President Biden’s address to the nation on Feb. 22 to remember 500,000 souls, were transformative. The former forever linked Leonard Cohen’s anthem, “Hallelujah,” my favorite song, to the pandemic.
  • A wall of 150,000 (and counting) red hearts in London, called the National Covid Memorial Wall by the Thames, captures the love the victims in the United Kingdom leave behind.

I have even calculated the losses in terms I can relate to, like coffee shops and small towns. If everyone in our country who died from the pandemic gathered on a Saturday morning, 30 to a location, they would fill 19,010 coffee shops. As for small towns, we have lost the equivalent of 23 small towns (of 500 persons) in every state. In Iowa, that would be Ellsworth, Collins, Zearing, Radcliffe and 19 more. You get the picture. Just today, by 4 p.m., 519 persons had already died, the equivalent of another small town, gone forever. 

In such ways, I have kept trying to make a visceral connection to the largely virtual experience of COVID-19. Remembering the victims as lights, flags, hearts and quilt squares was a start for me, but it was picturing the victims as “faces” that was the gateway to addressing my deep grief. 

Here is how my turning point happened. A couple weeks ago, I was awakened in the pre-dawn hours by a memory from June 4, 1993. In a waking dream, an exhibit called “100,000 Faces” came back vividly. I had seen it at Scheman Auditorium on the Iowa State University campus. (The photo exhibit was sponsored by the Board of Church and Society of the United Methodist Church — Iowa Annual Conference and the Iowa Peace Network.) Jennifer Lindberg, 24, a Mennonite volunteer and originator of the exhibit, worked with volunteers to cut out 100,000 pictures of children and adults to create two- by four-foot panels for a mural to help people comprehend the number of human beings killed in the Persian Gulf War. I remembered that it took several hours to view only part of the exhibit. I remembered being overwhelmed by the montages of faces: Muslims praying. African women drawing water at wells. Japanese businessmen working in cities. Most of the images were of Americans at work and play because of the limited number of global images in available magazines. Yet the number of deaths became real and personal. (It is another story altogether that U.S. casualties were represented by two panels and other casualties — mostly from Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Israel and Palestine— by 448 panels.) In my dream, I understood again the tragedy and scope of overwhelming loss. 

My recent reminder of “100,000 Faces” has been a springboard to genuinely begin grieving the accumulated U.S. losses from COVID-19. It is an aid in imagining an exhibit almost six times its size. Panels with nearly 600,000 faces would create a mural over two miles long! So many lives, so abruptly interrupted! I need such visual imagery to grasp the magnitude of our interconnectedness.   

What do I plan to do with grief on this scale? Three things come to mind.

First, it being Earth Day as I write this, I plan to plant a tree sometime in the next year in honor of the victims.

Secondly, I designed a wristband that I plan to wear for a year. It is black with white lettering and reads, simply: I remember. 

Finally, I feel I owe it to those who are gone to live more mindfully and, yeah, to continue to wear a mask. I want to plan my re-entry carefully, like we were asked to do with vaccines. It is a privilege to just be alive and still invited to be here on Earth. Even though the world seems politically and environmentally quite messy, I have been spared to go out and make it better. And for that I am grateful.

FOR PERSONAL/JOURNAL REFLECTION:

  1. Read the above reflection. Answer the following in your journal: What have I learned from this time that might be of value to others?

FOR GROUP STUDY:

      1.   Read aloud Session CIV.

      2.   Ask each person to answer the Story Circle Prompt. 

[View Past Sessions Here]

Note: Holiness in Our MidstSharing Our Stories to Encourage and Heal is a monthly on-line feature created by Janis Pyle to facilitate sharing of our personal experiences, thoughts, beliefs, and spiritual practices with one another, especially through stories. Barriers are broken down when we begin to see all persons, even those with whom we disagree ideologically, as sacred and constantly attended to by a loving Creator. Each column is accompanied by a “story circle” prompt and study guides for personal and group reflection. To share your stories, contact Hannah Button-Harrison at communications@nplains.org. Janis Pyle can be reached at janispyle@yahoo.com.

Message from District Board and Cluster Ministers on COVID-19 Pandemic Response

Date:  February 6, 2021
To: Pastors, Lay Leaders and Congregations of Northern Plains District
From: Northern Plains District Board of Administration and Cluster Ministers
Re:  COVID-19 Pandemic

We always give thanks to God for all of you and mention you in our prayers, constantly remembering before our God and Father your work of faith and labor of love and steadfastness of hope in our Lord Jesus Christ” (1 Thessalonians 1:2).

We are filled with deep gratitude for the pastors, lay leaders, and congregations of the Northern Plains District, who have faithfully sought to share the good news of Jesus Christ throughout this pandemic.  You have found creative ways to gather and continue the work of Jesus—online and in person—ever mindful of the safety and health of your members.

Sometimes this has involved learning how to use new technology.  Sometimes this has required pivoting quickly to respond to an ever-changing situation.  Sometimes this has meant listening to and balancing different viewpoints.  Sometimes it has required making difficult and unpopular decisions.  Sometimes it has involved personal risk.  Always it has involved courage and innovation.  It has been a work of faith, a labor of love, an expression of hope.  And we give God thanks and continue to remember you in our prayers.

As the vaccine rollout continues, it can be tempting to relax the restrictions we have put in place to keep everyone safe and ensure that our faith communities don’t become super spreaders.  However, we encourage you to remain faithful in the call to “love your neighbor as yourself” (Matthew 22:39).  Please be mindful of the situation in your geographic area as you make decisions about next steps.  Pay attention to the numbers and whether the case count is rising, has leveled off, or is declining in your community.  Respect the recommendations of your state and local authorities regarding in-person gatherings and how best to prevent the spread of COVID-19.  Continue adhering to what we know to be best practices regarding social distancing, wearing masks, and cleaning.

In addition, studies have shown that singing can contribute to spread.  If you are gathering in person and choosing to sing, please do so in ways that are limited and safe to minimize the risk.  We know this is difficult.  We long to gather in person.  We long to greet one another with a warm hug.  We long to share communal meals.  We long to “sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs to God” (Ephesians 5:19).  However, even as we cherish the glimmer of hope offered by the vaccine, we must remain diligent in our efforts to protect one another.

Remember your leaders, who spoke the word of God to you…” (Hebrews 13:7).  COVID-19 has affected us all.  Pastors and church leaders have experienced the added weight/stress of making decisions (that affect many) about something they’ve never experienced before.  As we all seek to respond to continually changing circumstances, please be slow to criticize, quick to encourage, constant in prayer, and eager to extend grace to pastors, church leaders, and one another.  “Be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you” (Ephesians 4:32).

As we continue to make decisions about gathering together in person, let us discern together the timeless wisdom of scripture: “…Love one another.  As I have loved you, so you must love one another.  By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another” (John 13:34-35).  “I therefore, a prisoner for the Lord, urge you to walk in a manner worthy of the calling to which you have been called, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another in love, eager to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace” (Ephesians 4:1-3).  “Love never gives up.  Loves cares more for others than for self.  Love doesn’t want what it doesn’t have.  Love doesn’t strut, doesn’t have a swelled head, doesn’t force itself on others, isn’t always ‘me first,’ doesn’t fly off the handle, doesn’t keep score of the sins of others, doesn’t revel when others grovel, takes pleasure in the flowering of truth, puts up with anything, trusts God always, always looks for the best, never looks back, but keeps going to the end.  Love never dies” (1 Corinthians 13:4-8a; The Message).

Additional resources may be found at:
·         COVID-19 Pandemic Response – Church of the Brethren
·         Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) | CDC
·         Resources on COVID-19 for Churches (nationalcouncilofchurches.us)
·         Iowa Department of Public Health – Protecting and Improving the Health of Iowans > Home
·         Minnesota Department of Health (state.mn.us)
·         Home (mt.gov).

Let us continue the work of Jesus through these challenging times, as we know you are doing, with an attitude of respect, courtesy, humility and love.  And may these guidelines help us continue as good stewards in containing the virus and deciding how and when we should meet in person.

Dave Kerkove, District Board President and Cluster Minister
davekerkove@gmail.com, 515-313-3705
Paul Shaver, District Moderator and Cluster Minister
repaul.ivestercob@gmail.com, 319-423-9034
Beth Cage, District Recording Secretary and Cluster Minister
bcage@hbcsc.net, 507-951-4532
Tim Button-Harrison, District Executive Minister
de@nplains.org, 641-485-5604